Welcome to  your new Wine Concierge Service.

At Great Wine Going, we make hand-selected wines  available to budding and experienced wine enthusiasts alike.

We pride ourselves on our ability to source and deliver interesting and under-represented wines of incredible value, through our simple and reliable service.

In order to maintain our commitment to quality and value, we currently offer one carefully selected wine at a time in limited allocations. If our offer takes your fancy, be sure to make your move before it disappears.

Story Behind The Wine

Who makes it:

Back in 1896, the Roux family acquired the Château du Trignon, and began the laborious process of converting the estate from mixed farming to viticulture. Five generations have since helped establish it as one of the top producers in the Southern Rhône. In 2007, the estate was bought by the Quiot family, themselves Rhône winegrowers for over 250 years who have established this wonderful property in the southern Rhone Valley. Their story begins at Chateauneuf-du-Pape where Antoine Quiot acquired a few hectares of vines in 1748 and it is the 13th generation of the family that currently work this estate.

Vineyard:

The vineyards are situated high into the Montmirail slopes, with limestone soils in some parts and sandier, more free-draining soils in others. It’s noticeably cooler than nearby Chateauneuf-du-Pape, especially since it’s right in the path of the Mistral winds as they blow down the Rhone Valley.  This Gigondas comes from vines planted on three different soil types: soft clay-limestone; alluvium with split pebbles; yellow sand and sandstone.

Winery:

The grapes were partially destemmed, and fermented/macerated for three to four weeks. A portion of the wine underwent malolactic and ageing in oak barrels. Partial de-stemming of the grapes. One third of the wine spends about a year in barrel before being blended with the concrete tanks. The concrete tanks all receive Malolactic fermentation. 15 out of 60 barrels are changed every year. During the 3 to 4 weeks of vatting time, the wine is being pumped over several times a day according to tastings. The wine is cold soaked before fermentation then stays around 25C as long as needed and finishes around 30C which rounds and softens the wine.

The Back Story:

Gigondas is a really small village and wine appellation in the Dentelles de Montmirail mountains in France, 457 miles directly south of Paris just 30 minutes from Chateauneuf du Pape on your way to Marseille. This is an all red wine-producing region, with roots in ancient Roman culture. The name derives from the Latin “Jocunditas”, which means “great pleasure,” as it had been a sort of vacation haven for Roman soldiers.

Wine production enjoyed a quiet growth through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. A Gigondas won a prestigious gold medal at an agricultural fair in Paris in 1894. However, for much of the 1800s and early 1900s, the juice was often sent to other parts of France to bulk out weaker wines. Quality has improved greatly since then. It became an official Cotes du Rhone Villages AOC in the 1950s, and struck out to become its own AOC in 1971.

Gigondas is made from up to 80% Grenache, and minimum 15% each of Syrah and Mourvedre. A maximum 10% is allowable for other Rhone grapes, such as Rousanne, Marsanne, Clairette, and Cinsault. The only grape not permissible is Carignan. Grapes are chosen in the triage method, meaning handpicked to select the healthiest fruit.

This blend of varietals is very similar to that of nearby Chateauneuf du Pape. and it is often referred to as a poor man’s Chateauneuf. Although one should think of Gigondas in its own right. The wines tend to be more forward and powerful when consumed young, at three to five years after the vintage date. Some can also take cellar aging, if one has the patience.

Welcome to  your new Wine Concierge Service.

At Great Wine Going, we make hand-selected wines  available to budding and experienced wine enthusiasts alike.

We pride ourselves on our ability to source and deliver interesting and under-represented wines of incredible value, through our simple and reliable service.

In order to maintain our commitment to quality and value, we currently offer one carefully selected wine at a time in limited allocations. If our offer takes your fancy, be sure to make your move before it disappears.

Chateau du Trignon, Gigondas

RRP £28

Our All-Inclusive Offer £23

Free shipping on orders of 3 bottles

Plus next day delivery [including Saturdays] when you order before 2pm

The Basics

Vintage: 2012

Country: France

Region: Rhone Valley

Appellation: Gigondas

Grape: Grenache  80%; balance of Syrah, Mourvedre, Cinsault

Alcohol: 14%

Closure: Cork

Pairing and Serving This Wine

Food Pairing: This robust wine will go well with most red meat dishes, but our favourite dishes to really complement its aromatic, rustic fullness are a lamb shank or peppered steak dish.

Serving the Wine: It is not unusual for the wine to have slightly musty aromas immediately upon opening but this dissipates quickly to reveal it’s wonderful aromas. Aerate if possible for at least 30 minutes and use a large Bordeaux style glass to get the full sensory and optical pleasure from the wine.

Serving temperature should be in the range 14-17 C ( 57-63F). Personally I prefer them at the lower end of the spectrum to maintain an “edge” to the mouthfeel and they will of course warm a little as you drink them.

Why You Should Buy This Wine
  • Because it’s a really well-made, full bodied wine with a clean and precise aroma and taste.
  • Made by one of the most well-established producers in the area with a reputation for consistently high quality.
  • Described variously as “truly delicious” and “brilliant” if you like high quality Rhone wines.
What You Can Expect

A complex bouquet with smoky notes of mocha and pine resin, evolving into black fruit aromas, in particular black cherry.

The palate is fresh and clean on entry, balanced and concentrated, with a persistent finish.

Intense ruby colour. Strawberries and redcurrants on the nose. Smooth and well-balanced on the palate.

Story Behind The Wine

Who makes it:

Back in 1896, the Roux family acquired the Château du Trignon, and began the laborious process of converting the estate from mixed farming to viticulture. Five generations have since helped establish it as one of the top producers in the Southern Rhône. In 2007, the estate was bought by the Quiot family, themselves Rhône winegrowers for over 250 years who have established this wonderful property in the southern Rhone Valley. Their story begins at Chateauneuf-du-Pape where Antoine Quiot acquired a few hectares of vines in 1748 and it is the 13th generation of the family that currently work this estate.

Vineyard:

The vineyards are situated high into the Montmirail slopes, with limestone soils in some parts and sandier, more free-draining soils in others. It’s noticeably cooler than nearby Chateauneuf-du-Pape, especially since it’s right in the path of the Mistral winds as they blow down the Rhone Valley.  This Gigondas comes from vines planted on three different soil types: soft clay-limestone; alluvium with split pebbles; yellow sand and sandstone.

Winery:

The grapes were partially destemmed, and fermented/macerated for three to four weeks. A portion of the wine underwent malolactic and ageing in oak barrels. Partial de-stemming of the grapes. One third of the wine spends about a year in barrel before being blended with the concrete tanks. The concrete tanks all receive Malolactic fermentation. 15 out of 60 barrels are changed every year. During the 3 to 4 weeks of vatting time, the wine is being pumped over several times a day according to tastings. The wine is cold soaked before fermentation then stays around 25C as long as needed and finishes around 30C which rounds and softens the wine.

The Back Story:

Gigondas is a really small village and wine appellation in the Dentelles de Montmirail mountains in France, 457 miles directly south of Paris just 30 minutes from Chateauneuf du Pape on your way to Marseille. This is an all red wine-producing region, with roots in ancient Roman culture. The name derives from the Latin “Jocunditas”, which means “great pleasure,” as it had been a sort of vacation haven for Roman soldiers.

Wine production enjoyed a quiet growth through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. A Gigondas won a prestigious gold medal at an agricultural fair in Paris in 1894. However, for much of the 1800s and early 1900s, the juice was often sent to other parts of France to bulk out weaker wines. Quality has improved greatly since then. It became an official Cotes du Rhone Villages AOC in the 1950s, and struck out to become its own AOC in 1971.

Gigondas is made from up to 80% Grenache, and minimum 15% each of Syrah and Mourvedre. A maximum 10% is allowable for other Rhone grapes, such as Rousanne, Marsanne, Clairette, and Cinsault. The only grape not permissible is Carignan. Grapes are chosen in the triage method, meaning handpicked to select the healthiest fruit.

This blend of varietals is very similar to that of nearby Chateauneuf du Pape. and it is often referred to as a poor man’s Chateauneuf. Although one should think of Gigondas in its own right. The wines tend to be more forward and powerful when consumed young, at three to five years after the vintage date. Some can also take cellar aging, if one has the patience.